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Staying Healthy

Although staying healthy is much more than just eating well or remaining active, the fact remains that eating a healthy, balanced diet is an important part of maintaining good health, and can help you feel your best.

You need to eat the right number of calories for how active you are, so that you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use. If you eat or drink too much, you’ll put on weight. If you eat too little you’ll lose weight. The average man needs around 2,500 calories a day. The average woman needs 2,000 calories.

We should aim to eat a wide variety of foods to ensure that we are getting a balanced diet and that our body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

To help you get started we have listed a few top tips...

Base your meals on starchy foods

Starchy foods include potatoes, cereals, pasta, rice and bread. Choose wholegrain varieties when you can: they contain more fibre, and can make you feel full for longer. Starchy foods should make up around one third of the foods you eat. These foods provide the body with energy which helps to fuel your college day.

Eat lots of fruit and vegetables

It’s recommended that we eat at least five portions of different types of fruit and vegetables a day. Fruit and vegetables are packed full of vitamins & minerals, not only are these important for fighting disease, but they also help you to have nice skin, shiny hair and strong nails.

Fuel your brain and eat more fish

Fish is a good source of protein and contains many vitamins and minerals. Aim for at least two portions a week, including at least one portion of oily fish. Oily fish is high in omega-3 fats, which may help to prevent heart disease.Studies, have shown that an intake of essential fats, especially Omega 3 Fats can reduce feeling of sadness and enhance mood.

Cut down on saturated fat and sugar

we all need some fat in our diet. But it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat we’re eating. There are two main types of fat: saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease. Saturated fat is found in many foods, such as hard cheese, cakes, biscuits, sausages, cream, butter, lard and pies. Try to cut down, and choose foods that contain unsaturated rather than saturated fats, such as vegetable oils, oily fish and avocados.

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