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Degree Students to present their work at International Society for Equine Sciences Conference

Posted on 2nd June 2014 in Equine Management, HE News, Higher Education

The work of seven Hadlow College degree students, supported by Total Contact Saddles, will soon be presented at the 10th Annual International Society for Equine Sciences Conference (ISES) in Copenhagen in August 2014.  This is a very prestigious conference and the student work has been peer reviewed to get this far to ensure the standard is high.

The seven thought provoking topics being presented are:

  • Celia Stone - “Difference and relationship in length of the ‘mean’ canter stride of a horse and the intermediate strides within a two stride double combination”
  • Vera Lewis - “Comparison of behaviour and distance travelled in horses with limited, daily and 24 hour turnout”
  • Sian Miller - ”A comparative study to determine if the use of stallion dung can change the defecation behaviour of stabled mares and geldings”
  • Rachel Tolfrey - “An investigation into the stress levels of horses kept in a college riding school environment”
  • Sophie Keepax - “An investigation into the effect of a GPS and treeless saddle (TCS) on the temperature of the horse’s back and its freedom of movement”
  • Laura Stancombe - “An Inquiry into the effects of various mounting techniques on the pressure of the horse’s back”
  • Melanie Nahum - “An investigation into the limb phasing characteristics and stride length of fully shod, partially shod and barefoot horses”

Three other studies (two from the above group) have also been presented at “The Back and Beyond Conference” organised by Gillian Higgins (of Horses Inside Out ‘fame’) at Cirencester College in March.

These studies were:

  • Rebecca Thick - “An investigation into the gait characteristics of endurance horses”
  • Melanie Nahum - “An investigation into the limb phasing characteristics and stride length of fully shod, partially shod and barefoot horses”
  • Sophie Keepax - “An investigation into the effect of a GPS and treeless saddle (TCS) on the temperature of the horse’s back and its freedom of movement”

These are excellent opportunities for our equine students, enabling them to get their research out to a wider audience.

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